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The best gaming laptops for 2024

We reviewed dozens of portable PCs — these are our favorite gaming laptops.

Photo by Sam Rutherford / Engadget

Gaming laptops are the true Transformers of the PC world: They’re powerful enough to play your favorite titles, ensuring you get the best gaming experience, but you can also harness their speed for media creation or extreme multitasking, like streaming high-resolution gameplay to Twitch. Today, you can even find a few that weight less than the smallest MacBook Pro, making them solid options for daily drivers as well. For the demanding Apex Legends player, or the power user just looking for a capable GPU to handle video encoding, it’ll be easier than ever to find the best gaming laptop to suit your needs — but sorting through the seemingly endless number of options can be taxing. We've tested and reviewed plenty of gaming laptops and we continue to do so as new models become available. Here, we outline our top picks for the best gaming laptops, along with everything you need to know before purchasing one.

Quick Overview

Your laptop buying journey starts and ends with the amount of money you're willing to spend. No surprise there. The good news: There are plenty of options for gamers of every budget. In particular, we're seeing some great entry-level PC gaming choices under $1,000, like Dell's G15 lineup. A cheap gaming laptop in this price range will definitely feel a bit flimsier than pricier models, and they'll likely skimp on RAM, storage and overall power. But most cheaper laptops should be able to handle the majority of video games running at 1080p at 60 frames per second, which is the bare minimum you'd want from any system.

Things get interesting when you start looking at the best gaming laptops in the mid-range space, with prices at $1,000 and higher. At that point, you'll start finding PCs like the ASUS Zephyrus ROG G14, one of our favorite gaming notebooks. In general, you can look forward to far better build quality than budget gaming laptops (metal cases!), improved graphics power and enough RAM and storage space to handle the most demanding games. These are the gaming machines we'd recommend for most people, as they'll keep you gaming and working for years before you need to worry about an upgrade.

If you're willing to spend around $1,800 or more, you can start considering more premium options like Razer's Blade, which is on-par with some of the best gaming PCs. Expect impeccably polished cases, the fastest hardware on the market, and ridiculously thin designs. The sky's the limit here: Alienware's uber customizable Area 51m is an enormous beast that can cost up to $4,700. Few people need a machine that high-end, but if you're a gamer with extra cash to burn, it may be worth taking a close look at some of these pricier systems.

Origin Evo16

The answer to this question used to be relatively simple: Just get an Intel chip with an NVIDIA GPU. But over the last few years AMD has stepped up its game with its Ryzen notebook processors, which are better suited for juggling multiple tasks at once (like streaming to Twitch while blasting fools in Fortnite). Intel responded with its impressive 12th and 13th-gen chips, but it’s nice to have decent Ryzen AMD alternatives available, especially since they’re often cheaper than comparable Intel models.

When it comes to video cards, though, AMD is still catching up. Its Radeon RX 6000M GPU has been a fantastic performer in notebooks like ASUS’s ROG Strix G15, but it lags behind NVIDIA when it comes to newer features like ray tracing. (We’re still waiting to test AMD’s new Radeon 7000 series mobile graphics.) At the very least, a Radeon-powered notebook can approach the general gaming performance of the NVIDIA RTX 3070 and 3080 GPUs.

If you want to future-proof your purchase, or you’re just eager to see how much better ray tracing can make your games look, you’re probably better off with an NVIDIA video card. They’re in far more systems, and it’s clear that they have better optimized ray tracing technology. NVIDIA GeForce RTX GPUs also feature the company’s DLSS technology, which uses AI to upscale games to higher resolutions. That’ll let you play a game like Destiny 2 in 4K with faster frame rates. That’s useful if you’re trying to take advantage of a high refresh rate monitor.

You’ll still find plenty of laptops with NVIDIA’s older RTX 30-series GPUs these days, and they’ll still give you tremendous performance. But to be safe, it’s probably worth opting for the newer RTX 40-series systems, since they support the newer DLSS 3 technology and offer a wealth of performance upgrades. (If you’re looking out for the best deals, you can probably find some killer RTX 3070 laptops out there.) The entry-level RTX 4050 is a solid start, but we’d suggest going for a 4060 or 4070 if you’re aiming to maximize your framerates on faster screens. The RTX 4080 and RTX 4090 are both incredibly powerful, but they typically make systems far too expensive for most users.

It’s worth noting that NVIDIA’s mobile graphics cards aren’t directly comparable to its more powerful desktop hardware. PC makers can also tweak voltages to make gaming performance better in a thinner case. Basically, these laptops may not be desktop replacements — don’t be surprised if you see notebooks that perform very differently, even if they’re all equipped with the same GPU.

Razer Blade 15

Screen size is a good place to start when judging gaming notebooks. In general, 15-inch laptops will be the best balance of immersion and portability, while larger 17-inch models are heftier, but naturally give you more screen real estate. There are some 13-inch gaming notebooks, like the Razer Blade Stealth, but paradoxically you'll often end up paying more for those than slightly larger 15-inch options. We’re also seeing plenty of 14-inch options, like the Zephyrus G14 and Blade 14, which are generally beefier than 13-inch laptops while still being relatively portable.

But these days, there is plenty to consider beyond screen size. For one: refresh rates. Most monitors refresh their screens vertically 60 times per second, or at 60Hz. That's a standard in use since black and white NTSC TVs. But over the past few years, displays have evolved considerably. Now, 120Hz 1080p screens are the bare minimum you'd want in any gaming notebook — and there are faster 144Hz, 240Hz and even 360Hz panels. All of this is in the service of one thing: making everything on your display look as smooth as possible.

For games, higher refresh rates also help eliminate screen tearing and other artifacts that could get in the way of your frag fest. And for everything else, it just leads to a better viewing experience. Even scrolling a web page on a 120Hz or faster monitor is starkly different from a 60Hz screen. Instead of seeing a jittery wall of text and pictures, everything moves seamlessly, as if you're unwinding a glossy paper magazine. Going beyond 120Hz makes gameplay look even more responsive, which to some players gives them a slight advantage.

Gigabyte Aero 15
Steve Dent/Engadget

Not to make things more complicated, but you should also keep an eye out for NVIDIA's G-SYNC and AMD's FreeSync. They're both adaptive sync technologies that can match your screen's refresh rate with the framerate of your game. That also helps to reduce screen tearing and make gameplay smoother. Consider them nice bonuses on top of one of the best gaming monitors with a high refresh rate; they're not necessary, but they can still offer a slight visual improvement.

See Also:

One more thing: Most of these suggestions are related to LCD screens, not OLEDs. While OLED makes a phenomenal choice for TVs, it's a bit more complicated when it comes to gaming laptops. They're mostly limited to 60Hz, though some models offer 90Hz. Still, you won’t see the smoothness of a 120Hz or 144Hz screen. OLEDs also typically come as 4K or 3.5K panels – you'll need a ton of GPU power to run games natively at that resolution. They look incredible, with the best black levels and contrast on the market, but we think most gamers would be better off with an LCD.

ASUS ROG G14
Devindra Hardawar/Engadget
  • Get at least 16GB of RAM. And if you're planning to do a ton of multitasking while streaming, 32GB is worth considering.

  • Storage is still a huge concern. These days, I'd recommend aiming for a 1TB M.2 SSD, which should be enough space to juggle a few large titles like Destiny 2. (If you can afford the jump to a 2TB SSD though, just do it.) Some laptops also have room for standard SATA hard drives, which are far cheaper than M.2's and can hold more data.

  • Get your hands on a system before you buy it. I'd recommend snagging the best gaming laptop for you from a retailer with a simple return policy, like Amazon or Best Buy. If you don't like it, you can always ship it back easily.

  • Don't forget about accessories! For the best performance, you'll need a good mouse, keyboard and a headset — these are some of the best gaming accessories for gaming PCs and laptops.

We review gaming laptops with the same amount of rigor as we approach traditional notebooks. We test build quality by checking cases for any undesirable flexible spots, as well as the strength of screen hinges during furious typing and Halo Infinite sessions. We benchmark every gaming notebook with PCMark 10, a variety of 3DMark tests, Cinebench and Geekbench. We also use NVIDIA’s Frameview app to measure the average framerates in Cyberpunk 2077, Halo Infinite and other titles. For media creation, we transcode a 4K movie clip into 1080p using Handbrake’s CPU and GPU encoding options.

Displays are tested under indoor and outdoor lighting with productivity apps, video playback and gameplay. We also try to stress the full refresh rate of every gaming notebook’s screen by benchmarking Halo Infinite, Overwatch 2 and other titles. Laptop speakers are judged by how well they can play back music, movies and the occasional game session with detail and clarity, and without any obvious distortion.

When it comes to battery life, we see how long gaming systems last with a mixture of real-world productivity apps and gameplay, and we also test with PCMark 10’s “Modern office” battery test. In addition, we’re judging the quality of a machine’s keyboard with typing tests as well as relative accuracy and comfort during extended gaming sessions.

Photo by Sam Rutherford/Engadget

Read our full ASUS ROG Zephyrus G14 review

CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 8945HS | GPU: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4070 | RAM: Up to 32GB | Storage: Up to 1TB | Screen size: 14-inch | Refresh rate: 120Hz | Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi | Battery life: Up to 7.5 hours

The beauty of the ASUS ROG Zephryus G14 is that it features an all-new unibody aluminum chassis, a vibrant 120Hz OLED display, solid performance and tons of ports–all for hundreds less than an equivalent Razer Blade 14. It even has a built-in microSD card reader and presets for several color gamuts, so it can easily pull double duty as a photo/video editing machine. Its audio is also way above average thanks to punchy up-firing stereo speakers. Battery life is solid too, with the Zepyrus lasting just shy of eight hours on our rundown test. And to top it off, the G14 weighs almost half a pound less than rival laptops with similar designs. The main downsides are that its GPU caps out at an RTX 4070 (instead of a 4080 like on the previous model) and that its RAM is soldered in. But if you want a really great all-rounder that offers big power in a portable package, this system has to be at the top of your list. — Sam Rutherford, Senior Writer, Reviews

Pros
  • Beautiful understated design
  • Gorgeous OLED screen
  • Strong performance
  • Good port selection
  • Punchy speakers
Cons
  • Bottom vents can get a bit toasty
  • Keyboard only has single-zone lighting
  • Armoury Crate app is kind of messy
  • RAM is soldered in
$2,000 at Best Buy

CPU: Intel Core i5 | GPU: NVIDIA RTX 3050 | RAM: 8GB | Storage: 512GB | Screen size: 15.6-inch | Refresh rate: 120Hz | Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi

We've been fans of Dell's G5 line ever since it first appeared a few years ago and it remains the best budget gaming laptop out there that can still provide a top-notch gaming experience. Now dubbed the G15, it starts at under $1,000 and, while not the most powerful gaming laptop, it features all of the latest hardware, like Intel's 13th-generation CPUs and NVIDIA's RTX 40-series cards. (You can also find AMD Ryzen chips in some models.) This budget-friendly gaming laptop is a bit heavy, weighing over five pounds, but it's a solid notebook otherwise. And you can even bring it into mid-range gaming territory if you spec up to the RTX 4060.

Pros
  • Affordable
  • Supports NVIDIA RTX 40-series GPUs
  • Good performance for the price
Cons
  • On the heavy side
$950 at Amazon
Will Lipman Photography for Engadget

Read our full Razer Blade 15 review

CPU: Intel Core i7 | GPU: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti | RAM: 16GB | Storage: 1TB | Screen size: 15.6-inch | Refresh rate: 240Hz | Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi | Battery life: Up to 5.5 hours

Razer continues to do a stellar job of delivering bleeding-edge hardware in a sleek package that would make Mac users jealous. The Blade 15 has just about everything you'd want for great gaming, including NVIDIA's RTX 4080, Intel's 13th-gen CPUs and speedy quad-HD screens. Our recommendation? Consider the model with a Quad HD 165Hz screen and an RTX 4060 GPU for $2,500. You can easily save some cash by going for a cheaper notebook, but they won't feel nearly as polished as the Blade.

Pros
  • Polished design
  • Great performance
  • Can be configured with a 165Hz screen
Cons
  • Expensive
$3,299 at Amazon
Explore More Buying Options
$1,500 at Best Buy
Photo by Devindra Hardawar / Engadget

CPU: Intel Core i7 | GPU: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4060 | RAM: 16GB | Storage: 1TB | Screen size: 18-inch | Refresh rate: 480Hz | Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi | Battery life: Up to 5.5 hours

If you’re searching for a gigantic Windows laptop, Alienware’s m18 is its biggest gaming laptop ever, and it packs in just about everything we’d want including a really big screen. It can be equipped with Intel and AMD’s fastest CPUs, as well as NVIDIA’s fastest GPUs (including the 4090). Its base configuration with an RTX 4060 is also surprisingly affordable for an 18-inch laptop, starting at $2,100. We’ve always liked Alienware’s m-series gaming laptops, but this year they’re more refined, with better cooling and a slightly sleeker design. You can also opt for CherryMX mechanical keys, which deliver a desktop-like gaming and typing experience.

Pros
  • Huge 18-inch screen
  • Solid performance
  • Sleeker design than previous version
Cons
  • Unwieldy; not very portable
$2,335 at Amazon

Read our full ASUS ROG Zephyrus Duo 16 review

CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 6900HX | GPU: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti | RAM: 32GB | Storage: 1TB | Screen size: 16-inch | Refresh rate: 165Hz | Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi | Battery life: Up to 3.5 hours

You know if you actually need a dual-screen laptop: Maybe a single 17-inch screen isn’t enough, or you want a mobile setup that’s closer to a multi-monitor desktop. If that’s the case, the Zephyrus Duo 16 is the best laptop for you. It’s powerful, and its extra 14-inch screen can easily let you multitask while gaming dutifully working. It also has all of the latest hardware you’d want, like AMD’s new Ryzen chips and NVIDIA’s RTX 4000 GPUs. Sure, it’s nowhere near portable, but a true multitasker won’t mind.

Pros
  • Powerful performance
  • Handy additional 14-inch display below main 17-inch screen
Cons
  • Not very portable
$2,550 at Amazon

We were eager to test the Framework Laptop 16 since it promised both modular customizability and a decent amount of gaming power. But while we appreciated just how repairable and upgradeable it is, its actual gaming performance was middling for its high price. You could always buy it without the additional GPU, but that makes it more of a daily workhorse than a gaming system.

On a brighter note, we were pleased to see MSI return to form with the Stealth Studio 14, which is far faster and more attractive than the previous model.

We were amazed to see a genuine 4K/1080p native screen in the Razer Blade 16, but it’s far too expensive and impractical, even for such a pricey brand. Similarly, we found the Razer Blade 18 to be both oversized and overpriced.

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